WOUND DRESSING KNOW-HOW:
Smarten up on treating the most frequent minor injuries, and find the right wound dressing from a selection of universal and high-tech solutions.

Do not play down a small wound: Every small impairment of your skin deserves attention and the right treatment, so that your skin can heal off perfectly. Fortunately, the most common everyday injuries are minor wounds which can easily be attended to with an adhesive bandage.

 

Whether you have cut yourself while chopping some vegetables, grazed your skin while scratching along a wall or when falling on your hands – a bandage will attend to these minor injuries and help them heal better.


SOME SIMPLE STEPS FOR TREATING WOUNDS

Stay calm and reassure the person, even when there is a lot of bleeding. Decide if the casualty needs medical aid; ask for advice, if not sure.

 

With children: Explain what you are doing, that it might be a little painful but they will soon feel better.

Make sure you wash your hands before applying bandages or dressings or wear disposable surgical gloves – this will cut the risk of infection.

 

A minor wound will soon stop bleeding. If it does not, apply a little pressure to the spot with a non-stick pad until it stops.

 

If the bleeding continues, apply more gauze pads and keep pressure on the wound and seek medical advice.

Clean the wound carefully, wiping away any dirt and grit. Use a clean cotton cloth sprayed with disinfectant or rinse with cold water, then pat area dry before applying a clean dressing. Do not remove embedded objects, leave that to medical staff.

Disinfect, then cover the injured area with an appropriate dressing such as a wound pad, compress or an adhesive bandage.

 

Keep all cuts clean and change dressing regularly.

Back to top

SCRATCHES AND CUTS

Cuts: A cut is an area of severed skin that has been penetrated with a sharp edge, such as a knife, a small tool or the edge of a sheet of paper (paper cuts are also painful). The wound will often bleed and have slightly dehiscent wound edges.

 

If you’ve suffered a cut or a scratch. The first thing to do is to clean and, if necessary, disinfect the wound and make sure that debris or small objects are removed. If the wound bleeds intensely, such as is sometimes the case with cuts in the face or on a finger, stop the bleeding by applying pressure with a sterile bandage. Depending on where your wound is located, choose a matching wound dressing. For example, minor wounds in the arm can discretely be covered with small Elastoplast Plastic Spots strips. A larger scratched area, such as on the knee, will need a strong bandage such as from the Elastoplast Plastic or Fabric ranges.

A cut with its descending wound edges;
Back to top

BLISTERS: DON'T POP THEM

Suffering from a blister? If it is still intact, decide if you want to leave it uncovered to let it heal on its own. But if it’s an area where it might get rubbed, such as on your hand or on the heel, you should definitely protect the blister from further friction as soon as possible with a Elastoplast Blister bandage. It will not only cushion the blister, but also prevent the blister roof from breaking so that it can be left to heal off on its own. On broken blisters, you can also apply a Blister bandage as it will provide ideal healing conditions.
Back to top

BODY PART LOGISTICS

Usually, our bandages like Elastoplast Plastic or Fabric that are available in different strip sizes or as dressing length (which can be cut to the desired size) will offer the right coverage for your wound. But depending on where your wound is located, there are better choices, which will offer the ideal shape, size, material or adhesion tailored to your specific needs.

 

Find your ideal bandage in the Elastoplast range.

 

Very small cuts and scrapes can be covered by Plastic Spots, tiny round bandages. Greater patches of skin, such as on knees or mobile parts such as joints which are exposed to a lot of movement and friction are ideally covered with an Elastoplast Fabric strip. Hands and fingers are covered perfectly if you have the Hand Pack at... well, hand.

Back to top

KIDS' CUTS AND ABRASIONS: MISFORTUNES WITHOUT TEARS

Children often fall during sports or playtime, injuring themselves with a graze or a cut. There are child-friendly ways to treat these minor, yet painful injuries, so that misfortunes are quickly forgotten.

 

Check out the skin friendly Elastoplast Minions featuring 12 different designs in the box. For scrapes or wounds on knees and elbows: use our especially designed Elastoplast Knee and Elbow with a large pad for better coverage.

 

Teenagers who hurt themselves while doing sports might prefer the durability of Elastoplast Fabric.

In order to give your family the best wound care there is, you should stock up on bandages in different shapes and sizes and benefit from the range of selection offered in packs such as Elastoplast Hand Pack containing strips especially suited to fit fingertips, knuckles etc. (Also, see our downloadable list for the perfectly stocked Medicine Cabinet).
Back to top

SENSITIVE SKIN?

Have you never been a great fan of wound dressing because you have sensitive skin? Then you might want to choose a bandage from the extra skin-friendly Elastoplast Sensitive.
Back to top

WOUND DRESSING KNOW-HOW

IS IT NOT BETTER TO LET SMALL WOUNDS DRY AT THE FRESH AIR, INSTEAD OF PUTTING ON A BANDAGE?

No. It is a wound care myth that keeping minor cuts and grazes uncovered helps them to heal faster. The contrary is true. Research shows that covered wounds heal more efficiently and have a reduced risk of infection. Elastoplast products provide safe protection until the wound is completely healed.

WHEN SHOULD I CONSULT A DOCTOR?

We recommend to contact a medical professional in the following circumstances:

  • if the wound is deep and causes major bleeding
  • if the wound shows signs of infection such as redness, warmth, pain and swelling
  • if there are embedded foreign objects
  • in case of an animal or human bite or in case of contact with animal blood
  • if the wound is in the area of the face
  • if there is insufficient tetanus vaccination
  • and of course any time you have questions or are uncertain

HOW OFTEN SHOULD I CHANGE MY BANDAGE?

Usually, wound dressings and bandages should be changed daily for hygienic reasons.

IT LOOKS LIKE MY WOUND GOT INFECTED AND SUPPURATES - WHAT SHOULD I DO?

Contact a medical professional as soon as you recognise signs of infection. Symptoms include not only the occurrence of pus but also symptoms such as swelling, redness, heat, pain, itching or burning. In case of infection the wound will need medical care and special medical treatment.

Back to top

Always see your doctor if the wound is deep, bleeding or shows signs of infection like reddening, swelling or warmth.

 

Also make sure to seek medical help if you are not able to clean the wound properly.

 

In case you have diabetes a proper wound care is of special importance. Always discuss any concerns you may have with your doctor and/or podiatrist, even for the care of minor wounds and skin cracks – especially on your feet.

 

Please note that none of the above given tips or recommendations substitute medical advice. Carefully read the instructions for use indicated on the product. Important: consult a health professional in case of any uncertainty of treating your wound properly.

 

The information provided through this website should not be used to diagnose or treat a health problem or disease. It is not a substitute for professional care or advice. If you have or suspect a health problem, you should consult your doctor. Never disregard professional medical advice or delay in seeking it, because of something you have read on this website.

 

For further information regarding Elastoplast products, please contact us via email on cscanada@beiersdorf.com.